Subsidiary Purchases Shares from Parent

Advanced financial accounting PowerPoint presentation. In this presentation we will discuss a consolidation process where we have a subsidiary that purchases shares from the parent. So what’s going to be the effect on the consolidation process? When we have a subsidiary that purchases shares from a parent get ready to account with advanced financial accounting. We are talking about a situation here where this subsidiary is purchasing shares from the parent what’s the effect on the consolidation process? In the past, the parent has often recognized a gain or loss on the difference between the selling price and the change in the carrying amount of its investment. So in the past, it’s often been recorded as a gain or loss on parent companies that difference as a gain or loss on the parent company’s income statement.

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Remeasure Financial Statement of Foreign Subsidiary

Advanced financial accounting PowerPoint presentation. In this presentation we will discuss the remeasurement process for financial statements of a foreign subsidiary. Get ready to account with advanced financial accounting remeasurement financial statement of foreign subsidiary remeasurement overview so we’re going to go through the process of the remeasurement. As you think of the measurement process, you want to be comparing and contrasting it to the translation process. So you’re envisioning basically you got a parent company. The parent company has a subsidiary the subsidiary is a foreign subsidiary. The subsidiary then conducts their books. Typically we’re thinking in a foreign currency right, that subsidiary is conducting their books in a foreign currency. If we need to consolidate the subsidiary into the parents financial statements, the parent uses dollars to measure their books subsidiary uses a foreign currency on the bookkeeping side, how do we get them over $2 so we can do the consolidation process. two methods generally we can use a translation method or a remeasurement method, and we have to determine which method we’re going to use by determining what the functional currency is. And once we know what the functional currency is, then we can determine whether we need to use the translation method or the remeasurement method. And they’re going to be slightly different. Now note, there’s also a third kind of option where we might have to use translation and remeasurement if there was a situation where the foreign currency has the financial statements, and something other than the US dollars and then the functional currency was not the currency that their bookkeeping was in, and it’s not the US dollar.

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Translation vs Remeasurement

Advanced financial accounting PowerPoint presentation. In this presentation we will discuss translation versus remeasurement. Get ready to account with advanced financial accounting, translation versus remeasurement methods to restate to foreign entities statements to US dollar. So the most straightforward methods can be translation of foreign entities functional currency statement to US dollars. So the translation is what we’ll use the most straightforward method when the entity statement is using the functional currency. So typically, if the if the entity is using the functional currency, and we need to translate it, then we’ll simply translate it from the functional currency to the US dollars. And then there’s remeasurement of foreign entities statement into its functional currency. So remeasurement means that the entity is running their bookkeeping in a currency that is not the functional currency. Right? So then we’re going to have to re measure we’re going to use this term re measure rather than translate the To the functional currency, so after we remeasure to the functional currency, after remeasurement statements need to be translated to the reporting currency if the functional currency is not the US dollar. So in other words, if we’re assuming, in this case, in the case of the remeasurement, or let’s say, we have an entity that we’re going to be consolidating a subsidiary entity in another country, and we’re in the US and we need to basically consolidate these data together in terms of US dollars at the end of the day, if the entity is using the functional currency as as their financial statements, their bookkeeping is in the functional currency, then we can simply use the term translate it to the US dollars, which will be the parent currency that we’re talking about here. If however, the foreign entity is having their books in some currency, that is not the functional currency, then what we’re going to have to do is re measure it. We want to use remeasurement To the functional currency, we want to make remeasure at first to the functional currency rather than straight to the US dollar. So we’re going to use remeasure to the functional currency. And after we re measure to the functional currency, if the functional currency is the US dollar, then then we should be able to stop there. That’s okay. If however, the functional currency is not the US dollar, then we would have to go from the functional currency and then translate to the US dollar. So we’ll talk a little bit more about that as we go. So let’s think about translation.

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Functional Currency

Advanced financial accounting PowerPoint presentation. In this presentation we will discuss functional currency get ready to account with advanced financial accounting, functional currency. When financial statements are restated from a foreign currency into US dollars, we must consider which exchange rate should be used to translate the foreign currency amounts to the domestic currency. So, when we translate the foreign currency to the domestic currency, we’ll have to determine what our exchange rate Are we going to be using in order to do so how will we account for translation gains and losses? So if there’s going to be a translation gain or loss, what are we going to do with that? In other words, should we put the translation gains and losses as part of the income statement reporting it on the income statement, the gains and losses that are due to the translation process exchange rates that may be used? So what kind of exchange rates might we use during this exchange process? Well, we could use the current rates probably the first thing that comes to mind you say, Hey, we got the financial status. As of the year ended of this time period, why don’t we just use the current rate. And that’s typically what we will do for the balance sheet amounts. And that typically makes sense for the balance sheet amounts, because remember, the financial statements, of course on the balance sheet represents where we are at a particular point in time. So simply converting them makes some sense on the balance sheet. But you also might think, Well, what about those things, you know, that we purchased, like fixed assets at a point in time, maybe we should use the point in time that we had the purchase took place. So you could argue on that on the balance sheet, but the current rate on the balance sheet and makes the most sense, but if you’re looking at the income statement, the current rate might not make as much sense because we’re measuring a timeframe that from a year will, let’s say, for a year’s timeframe from the beginning to the end, so maybe it doesn’t seem quite right to use simply the current rate, which would be the rate as of the end of the financial statements if we’re talking like December 31, rather than using some type of race. That would be representative of the period that would covered being January through December, we could use the historical rate, that’s gonna be the rate that exists at the time the initial transaction took place. And again, this one is often would make sense to us if we’re talking about a situation like if we bought equipment or something like that fixed assets, property, plant and equipment, large purchases that are on the books, we might say, well, maybe we should be putting those on the books at the rate that we should be using at the time, basically, the transaction took place. So maybe we would argue for the historical right there. And then we have the average rate for the period, generally a simple average for a period of time, usually the exchange rate used to measure revenues and expenses.

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Threshold Tests for Segment Reporting

 

Advanced financial accounting PowerPoint presentation. In this presentation we will discuss threshold tests for segments reporting, get ready to account with advanced financial accounting threshold tests for segment reporting separate supplemental disclosures that need to be made for separately reportable operating segments. So we’ve got these separately reportable operating segments, we have to then determine what type of reporting needs to be taking place for them. determining if a segment needs separately reported information. There are 310 percent quantitative rules FA SB specifies separate disclosure is needed for any segment that meets at least one of the three tests that follow. So we have the segment we got to think about Okay, do we need separate disclosure for this segment, and in order to determine that we’re going to use these 310 percent tests, they only need to meet one of these tests in order for the separate disclosure to be necessary that being 10% revenue test 10% profit or loss test and 10% assets tests. We’re going to go into more detail on each of these tests. Now some we’re going next slides we’ll be focusing in on these three items. So we’re going to start of course with the 10% revenue test. If an operating segments revenue, including both external sales and intersegment sales or transfers is 10% or more of total revenues from external sales plus intersegment. transactions of all operating segments, then segment is separately reported and supplemental disclosures must be provided for it in the annual report so that we have the 10% of revenue basically top line of course on the income statement to determine if the segment is separately reportable. Then we have the 10% of profit and loss. So now the next test now looking at the bottom line, of the income statement, as opposed to The top line if the absolute value of the segments profit or loss or absolute value, so, if we have a income or loss is 10% or more of the higher in absolute value of a the total profit of all operating segments that did not report a loss or be total loss of all operating segments that did report a loss, then the segment is separately reportable and supplementary disclosures must be provided for it in the annual report. So, you can think about these tests you got the 10% of the top line of the income statement, the revenue, basically 10% of the bottom line, profit or loss on the income statement. Now, we’re looking at the balance sheet 10% of assets tests. If these segments assets are 10% or more of the total assets of all operating segments, then the segment is separately reportable and supplementary disclosures must be provided for it in the annual report.

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Interim Financial Reporting Rules

Advanced financial accounting PowerPoint presentation. In this presentation we will take a look at interim financial reporting or rules get ready to account with advanced financial accounting. Interim financial reporting rules started off with interim report. So interim reports they will cover a time period of less than a single year. So when we’re thinking about the interim reports, when we’re thinking about interim information, we have the year in information when we think about financial statements, we often what pops into most people’s head most of the time are going to be for the year ended financial statements income statement covering January through December balance sheet covering the year end. If it’s a fiscal year calendar year in interim, then we’re going to be talking about the financial statements at some interim period typically quarterly, quarterly meaning first, second, third quarter and then you got the yearly information for the fourth quarter. Therefore, the interim reports they will cover a time period of less than a single year. The goal is to provide timely information about the company’s options. Throughout the year, so obviously more information is nice. We want timely information for the decision makers, we got the year end reports, it would be nice if we have the quarterly reports, which we have now, to give us more timely information as the year goes by. quarterly reports are required to be published for publicly held companies. So if you’re a publicly held company, that company’s stock is being traded on stock exchanges and whatnot, then people need current information. The market needs current information. Therefore, it’s a requirement to have the quarterly reporting for that timely information. The quarterly reports can generally be thought of as smaller versions of the annual report. So when we think about the annual reporting, what’s going to be included in it, the quarterly reports is, as you would kind of expect, right a smaller version of that as we’re doing the reporting for a timeframe that’s going to be less than the entire year. Here some type of interim reporting requirements form q 10 q or form 10 q sec s quarterly report.

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Threshold Tests for Segment Reporting

Advanced financial accounting PowerPoint presentation. In this presentation we will discuss threshold tests for segments reporting, get ready to account with advanced financial accounting threshold tests for segment reporting separate supplemental disclosures that need to be made for separately reportable operating segments. So we’ve got these separately reportable operating segments, we have to then determine what type of reporting needs to be taking place for them. determining if a segment needs separately reported information. There are 310 percent quantitative rules FA SB specifies separate disclosure is needed for any segment that meets at least one of the three tests that follow. So we have the segment we got to think about Okay, do we need separate disclosure for this segment, and in order to determine that we’re going to use these 310 percent tests, they only need to meet one of these tests in order for the separate disclosure to be necessary that being 10% revenue test 10% profit or loss test and 10% assets tests. We’re going to go into more detail on each of these tests. Now some we’re going next slides we’ll be focusing in on these three items. So we’re going to start of course with the 10% revenue test. If an operating segments revenue, including both external sales and intersegment sales or transfers is 10% or more of total revenues from external sales plus intersegment. transactions of all operating segments, then segment is separately reported and supplemental disclosures must be provided for it in the annual report so that we have the 10% of revenue basically top line of course on the income statement to determine if the segment is separately reportable. Then we have the 10% of profit and loss. So now the next test now looking at the bottom line, of the income statement, as opposed to The top line if the absolute value of the segments profit or loss or absolute value, so, if we have a income or loss is 10% or more of the higher in absolute value of a the total profit of all operating segments that did not report a loss or be total loss of all operating segments that did report a loss, then the segment is separately reportable and supplementary disclosures must be provided for it in the annual report. So, you can think about these tests you got the 10% of the top line of the income statement, the revenue, basically 10% of the bottom line, profit or loss on the income statement. Now, we’re looking at the balance sheet 10% of assets tests. If these segments assets are 10% or more of the total assets of all operating segments, then the segment is separately reportable and supplementary disclosures must be provided for it in the annual report.

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