Creating a Statement of Cash Flow-Indirect Method-Accounting%2C financial

Hello in this lecture we’re going to talk about creating a statement of cash flows using the indirect method, we will be able to define a statement of cash flows, create a statement of cash flows explain a process of creating a statement of cash flows designed to limit mistakes and define the indirect method. So what we’ll do is we’ll work through basically a problem and look through the statement of cash flows. We want to think about a few things we want to think about how to create a statement of cash flows, we want to think about a few definitions of what is a statement of cash flows, we want to kind of explain what the purpose is of a statement of cash flows and going through the process can help us to do that. Also want to point out that creating the statement of cash flows can help us with setting up a problem in such a way that we can limit the amount of mistakes that we will make. So a statement of cash flows is something that in a lot of firms, people generally often have problems to create the statement of cash flows. And it’s good practice to go in there and and create the statement of cash flows and try to create a system in which it’s easy for us to have checkpoints and see where a problem is going to happen.

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Statement of Cash Flow Indirect Method Change In Accounts Payable

In this presentation, we will continue on with our statement of cash flows using the indirect method looking in on the change in accounts payable, we’re going to be using this information or a comparative balance sheet income statement and other information focusing primarily on comparative balance sheet creating a worksheet with it, looking like this. This basically being the comparative balance sheet. But in a post closing trial balance format, we have our two periods and the difference between those periods here. Our goal is to find a home for all of these differences. Once we do so we’ll end up with basically the change in cash. That being our bottom line that we’re looking for. We’ve gone through this information in terms of the cash flows from operations. We’re currently looking through the current assets, and now we’re moving on to the current liabilities. So we’ve looked at the accounts receivable, the inventory, prepaid expenses, we have these here. We’re moving on now to a liability and notice when we do that, when we’re working From the worksheet, we’re kind of skipping over some things here.

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Statement of Cash Flow Indirect Method Change in Prepaid Expense

In this presentation, we will continue with the statement of cash flows indirect method looking at the change in prepaid expenses, we’re going to be using this information, we’ve got the comparative balance sheet, we’ve got the income statement and some additional information, we will be working primarily with the difference in the comparative balance sheet with the use of a worksheet taking this information to create this worksheet. So this is just basically a comparative balance sheet that has been condensed down to something that looks like a post closing trial balance. We are constructing our cash flows from operations from it, we have all of our differences. We’re basically just finding a home for these differences. We know if we do so that if we find a home for all of these differences, then it’ll add up to that difference, the difference in cash, which is basically the bottom line of our cash flow statement, or that’s what we want to get to in terms of adding up the cash flows. So we’ve gotten so far We’re working on the cash flows from operations. And we’ve done the cash flows in terms of the accounts receivable, inventory. Now we’re on prepaid expenses. We’re just going through these.

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Statement of Cash Flow Indirect Method Change In Accounts Receivable

In this presentation, we will continue putting together the statement of cash flows using the indirect method focusing here on the change in accounts receivable. The information will be a comparative balance sheet, the income statement and some added information we will be focusing in on a worksheet that was composed from the comparative balance sheet. So here is our worksheet. So our worksheet that we can pay that we made from the comparative balance sheet, current period, prior period change. So we have all of our balances here for the current period, the prior period and the change, we have put in this change. And this is really the column that we are focusing in on we’re trying to get to this change in cash by finding a home for all other changes. Once we find a home for all other changes. We will get to this change in cash the bottom line here 61,900. The major thing we’re looking for is right here. We’ve already taken a look at the change in the retained earnings. And the change in the accumulated depreciation. Now we’re going to look at the changes in current assets and current liabilities.

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Statement of Cash Flow Strategy

In this presentation, we will take a look at strategies for thinking about the statement of cash flows and how we will approach the statement of cash flows. When considering the statement of cash flows, we typically look at a worksheet or put together a worksheet such as this for my comparative balance sheet, that given the balance sheet accounts for the current year and the prior year or the current period, and the prior period, and then giving us the difference between those accounts. So we have the cash, we’ve got the accounts receivable inventory, we’re representing this in debits and credits. So this is in essence going to be a post closing trial balance one with just the balance sheet accounts, the debits represented with positive and the credits represented with negative numbers in this worksheet, so the debits minus the credits equals zero for the current year, the prior year. And then if we take the difference between all the accounts, and we were to add them up, then that’s going to equal zero as well. This will be the worksheet that we’re thinking about. Now. When can In the statement of cash flows, we can think about the statement of cash flows in a few different ways. We know that this, of course, is the change in cash, this is the time period in the current time period, the prior year, in this case, the prior period, the difference between those two is the difference in cash.

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Note Receivable Example

 

In this presentation we will discuss notes receivable, giving some examples of journal entries related to notes receivable and a trial balance so we can see the effect and impact on the accounts as well as the effect on net income of these transactions. first transaction, we’re gonna have 120 day 7% note giving the company EMI and extension on past due AR or accounts receivable of 6200. When considering book problems and real life problems, one of our challenges is to interpret what is actually happening what is going on, which party are we in this transaction in? Therefore, how are we going to record this transaction when we’re looking at notes receivable? A common problem with notes receivable is the conversion of an accounts receivable to a notes receivable. So in this case, that’s what we have. We have an accounts receivable here that includes an amount of Due to us by this particular company in AI so these are our books, we have a receivable people owing us money for prior transactions goods or services provided in the past and they owe us in total, all customers owe us 41,521 this customer in particular owes us 6200 of this amount in the receivable that could be found not in the general ledger which would give backup of transactions by date.

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Notes Receivable

In this presentation, we will take a look at notes receivable. We’re first going to consider the components of the notes receivable. And then we’ll take a look at the calculation of maturity and some interest calculations. When we look at the notes receivable, it’s important to remember that there are two components two people, two parties, at least to the note, that seems obvious. And in practice, it’s pretty clear who the two people are and what the note is and what the two people involved in the note our doing. However, when we’re writing the notes, or just looking at the notes as a third party that’s considering the note that has been documented. Or if we’re taking a look at a book problem, it’s a little bit more confusing to know which of the two parties are we talking about who’s making the note who is going to be paid at the end of the note time period? We’re considering a note receivable here, meaning we’re considering ourselves to be the business who is going to be receiving money. into the time period, meaning the customer is making a promise, the customer is in essence, we’re thinking of making a note in order to generate that promise, that will then be a promise to pay us in the future.

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Allowance Method % Accounts Receivable vs % Sales Method

In this presentation, we will be taking a look at the allowance method for accounts receivable focusing in on the calculation of the allowance for doubtful accounts. There are two methods that can be used in order to calculate the allowance for doubtful accounts accounts. One being the percentage of accounts receivable, the other is the percentage of sales, we will take a look at them both and look at the pros and cons of them. First, we’re going to look at the accounts receivable method. We’re going to start off with the percentage of accounts receivable method for a few different reasons. One, it’s the one that’s most often tested. And two is the one that may be most often used in practice often making the most sense to people that are looking at the two methods. It’s also a bit more complicated. So when we’re looking at test questions, they typically would focus on this method in order to have a bit more complicated process to do the calculation.

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