Customer, Sales, Revenue, or Accounts Receivable AR Cycle 1.30

QuickBooks Online 2021 customer sales revenue or accounts receivable AR cycle. Let’s get into it with Intuit QuickBooks Online 2021. Here we are in our Google search page, we’re going to be searching for QuickBooks Online at test drive, then we’re going to be clicking on the QuickBooks Online test drive for Intuit, the owner of QuickBooks, verifying that we are not a robot and continue. Here we are in our Craig’s design and landscaping services practice file, we’re going to hit the New button on the left hand side last time or in the prior section, we took a look at the items under the vendor section now we’re going to be taking a look at the items under the customers section. Remember that every business transaction has two sides to it.

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Salaries Expense 145

In this presentation, we will record a transaction related to salaries expense into our accounting system. Get ready, because here we go with aplos. Here we are in our not for profit organization dashboard, we’re going to jump on over to our Excel file to see what our objective will be here, we’re going to be in tab number six, tab number six, where we have our transaction. Here we are in our not for profit organization dashboard, we’re going to be jumping on over to Excel to see what our objective will be, we’re going to be in tab number six. So we’re in tab number six, we’re going to be recording the salaries expense.

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Cash Budget 415

Corporate Finance PowerPoint presentation. In this presentation, we will be discussing the cash budget Get ready, it’s time to take your chance with corporate finance, cash budget, as we consider the cash budget, let’s take a step back and think about the budgeting process. So we can think about where the cash budget will fit in it. So we got to start off with the sales projection, that’s going to be our first step. So we can think about the production plan if we manufacture inventory, or we think about the purchasing plan. If we purchase and sell inventory, then we can think about the pro forma income statement. Now the pro forma income statement is going to be on an accrual basis. But we also want to be considering the cash budget. So obviously, once we have once we start to construct the income statement, on an accrual basis, we can also think about what the cash flows will be.

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Parent Sale to Sub & Sub Resold

Advanced financial accounting. In this presentation we’re going to discuss an intercompany transaction where a parent makes a sale to a subsidiary and then the subsidiary resells it. In other words, we have this intercompany transaction, we want to think about how that is constructed. And then how we can do the reversing entry for it or a consolidation entry in the case of a consolidation of a parent and subsidiary in a consolidated financial statements, get ready to account with advanced financial accounting. So within a situation where we have a sale from P to s, and then S sells it to an outsider remember that as it goes to the outsider, that’s going to be the legitimate type of so that’s the arm’s length transaction, the sale from PETA is not so and therefore we kind of have to eliminate that. Now if it’s been sold to an outsider, then we have a situation where the inventory is still gone. There has been a sale being taken place. And so we so that’s good, but we still have to do the reversal of part of that intercompany transfer and it’s gonna boil down At the end of the day, basically debiting, the revenue account reversing revenue, and reversing the cost of goods sold. So this is the boiled down version. Now if you think about it, you might say what happy because if p sales to s, then you’re going to like debit cash credit, you know, you’re going to credit the sales, and then you debit cost of goods sold, and credit inventory and then asked is going to be recorded cash, and then they’re gonna be recording, then the other side go into inventory, and then right, there’s more, and then they made the sale to the outsider. So how do we boil this down? How does the intercompany boil down to just this right? We kind of kind of have an idea of that in our mind.

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Securities Carried at Fair Value Accounting

In this presentation, we’re going to focus in on situations where we have securities carried at fair value using fair value accounting, this will typically be the case if one company is investing in another company, and they do not own above the 20%. That’s going to be basically the general rule. In other words, they don’t have significant influence, and therefore, we’re going to be using the fair value accounting method for them get ready to account with advanced financial accounting. In a prior presentation, we discussed in general different accounting methods we were going to use depending on the level of control or influence that one company has on another company we set what can be kind of arbitrary kind of points, which means zero to 20%. We’re going to use one method that they carried value 20% to 50%, the equity method and then 51 through to 100. We might be having a consolidation at that point. So now let’s break that down and concentrate on each of these in a little bit more detail This time, let’s focus in on this first category. Now this would be the category where typically most of the time you would be you would be accounting for something as in most cases, if you’re just investing if one company is just investing like a normal type of investment, just like an individual’s investing, they don’t expect to have really influence over the decision making process, because they have, they don’t have a controlling interest in order to do so it’s just a normal type of investment type of situation, that’s going to be the norm kind of here. And then once once the ownership gets over to a certain percentage 20% 20% being quite large, I mean, if you think about the number of shares that are out there for a large company or something like that, like apple or something like that, you would need a lot of shares to basically be constituting 20% ownership.

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