Statement of Cash Flow Direct Method

In this presentation, we will take a look at the statement of cash flows using the direct method. Here’s going to be our information we got the comparative balance sheet, the income statement and some additional information. And we will use this information to put together our worksheet which will be the primary source used to create the statement of cash flows using the direct method. This is going to be our worksheet. Now most of this worksheet will be similar to what we have done for the indirect method, in that we took the difference in the balance sheet accounts. So we’re taking the current year and the prior year, the current period, the prior period, all the balance sheet accounts, we’ve got cashed down to the retained earnings for the balance sheet accounts. But we’re also in this case going to give us the income statement accounts for the current period. So in other words, we’re going to break out the retained earnings the amount to its component parts, meaning we’ve got net income being broken out on the income statement. We’ve got sales cost of goods sold, the income statement accounts. So it’s going to be our same kind of worksheet here, we’re going to be in balance, we’ve converted it from a plus and minus format, we’ve removed all of the subtitles as we did under the indirect method.

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Statement of Cash Flow Adjustments

This presentation we will continue on with our statement of cash flows, we’re not going to enter the final adjustments that we will need to finalize the statement of cash flows to bring those last few numbers to the correct balances. In order to do that, we’re going to use this information we’ve got our comparative balance sheet, our income statement and additional information. We put together most of our information so far with the comparative balance sheet, which we made into a worksheet. Now we’re going to use some of these other resources, the income statement, the additional resources to make those final adjustments, those fine tunings that are needed to get those few numbers that we have left and noted into balance. And this is going to be part of the normal practice where once we get this information set up, we can then make some comparisons such as net income does it tie out, such as depreciation does it tie out on the cash flow statement to what we see here on the income statement, then we can have this other information which will be given in both problems in practice, of course, we’ll just go to the gym. General Ledger. And we’ll get this information in a book problem, we don’t want to give all the detail of a general ledger or just when we’re going over an example.

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Statement of Cash Flow Indirect Method Change In Accounts Payable

In this presentation, we will continue on with our statement of cash flows using the indirect method looking in on the change in accounts payable, we’re going to be using this information or a comparative balance sheet income statement and other information focusing primarily on comparative balance sheet creating a worksheet with it, looking like this. This basically being the comparative balance sheet. But in a post closing trial balance format, we have our two periods and the difference between those periods here. Our goal is to find a home for all of these differences. Once we do so we’ll end up with basically the change in cash. That being our bottom line that we’re looking for. We’ve gone through this information in terms of the cash flows from operations. We’re currently looking through the current assets, and now we’re moving on to the current liabilities. So we’ve looked at the accounts receivable, the inventory, prepaid expenses, we have these here. We’re moving on now to a liability and notice when we do that, when we’re working From the worksheet, we’re kind of skipping over some things here.

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Statement of Cash Flow Indirect Method Change in Prepaid Expense

In this presentation, we will continue with the statement of cash flows indirect method looking at the change in prepaid expenses, we’re going to be using this information, we’ve got the comparative balance sheet, we’ve got the income statement and some additional information, we will be working primarily with the difference in the comparative balance sheet with the use of a worksheet taking this information to create this worksheet. So this is just basically a comparative balance sheet that has been condensed down to something that looks like a post closing trial balance. We are constructing our cash flows from operations from it, we have all of our differences. We’re basically just finding a home for these differences. We know if we do so that if we find a home for all of these differences, then it’ll add up to that difference, the difference in cash, which is basically the bottom line of our cash flow statement, or that’s what we want to get to in terms of adding up the cash flows. So we’ve gotten so far We’re working on the cash flows from operations. And we’ve done the cash flows in terms of the accounts receivable, inventory. Now we’re on prepaid expenses. We’re just going through these.

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Statement of Cash Flow Indirect Method Adjustments to Reconcile Net Income to Net Cash Provided

In this presentation, we will continue putting together a statement of cash flows using the indirect method focusing in on adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities. So this is going to be the information we will be using, we have the comparative balance sheet, the income statement added information, we took this comparative balance sheet to create our worksheet. So here is our worksheet for two time periods. This is the difference we’re basically looking to find a home for all of these differences we have done so with cash, and we’ve done so with a difference in retained earnings. So here’s cash, here’s net income, the difference in retained earnings, we will have to adjust net income shortly or at the end of the problem. We’ll we’ll take a look at that we’ll make an adjustment for it. We’re going to now find the difference for all the rest of these. Also note that of course cash is going to be the change in cash will be our bottom line. Never we’re going to recalculate this But it’s nice to know where we are ending up at. So this is kind of like even though it’s at the top of our worksheet, that’s where we want to end up by finding a home for everything else. So now we’re going to take a look at the adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities. So these are going to be those types of things that we look at the income statement, and we’re going to say that these are non cash activities, meaning income is calculated as revenue minus expenses. And the cash flow.

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Statement of Cash Flows Direct Method Vs Indirect Method

In this presentation, we will compare and contrast the direct method versus the indirect method for the statement of cash flows. It’s important to note that when we’re comparing the direct and indirect methods, we’re really only talking about the top part, the operating activities portion of the statement of cash flows. In other words, the investing activities and financing activities and in result will remain the same, we’re going to end up with the same result, which of course, will be the Indian cash that we can tie out to the balance sheet. And we’ll have the change of cash here, which is really kind of the what we’re looking for in the statement of cash flows. What’s going to differ is the operating activities, why are they going to differ? Why would we have the operating activities differ? Remember that the operating activities have to do with kind of the income statement you can think of it basically as the income statement being reformatted to a cash flow statement versus an accrual statement. So the income statement that we use is on an accrual basis, and we recognize that Revenue when it’s earned rather than when cash is received expenses when expenses are incurred rather than when cash is paid, that’s gonna be on an accrual basis.

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Bond Price Excel Formula

In this presentation, we will calculate the bond price explaining how this can be done using present value formulas within Excel. Remember that the bonds is going to be a great tool for both accounting and finance to describe the present value calculation. So that’s why it’s going to be used. Oftentimes It has two cash flows related to it, one’s going to be the face amount of the bond that’s going to be due at the end of the term of the bond. In our case, it’s going to be two years semiannual or four time periods. And the other is the flow of interest. So bonds are a great example because they have the two types of present value problems that we need in one area. So even if you’re not in an area where you’re dealing with bonds all the time, they’re still going to be used and useful to understand present value types of calculations. So here we’ve got the bond is going to have one cash flow of 100,000 at the end of four periods or two years, and we need to figure out what the present value is in order to price it back here at your at time period zero. And then we have these four payments in terms of the annuity 4000. And we need to take those and present value them, we could take each period and present value each payment and present value it. But the easier thing to do is to present value, an annuity when it’s applicable and present value, the one amount when it’s applicable. And therefore think of that about these as two basically separate cash flows that we’re going to have to present value separately. So we can do this multiple different ways. And it just depends on what you’re what tools you have. And where you are, in order to know how to do it. What you want to know is just that there’s different tools to do it. Anytime someone uses a different tool. What are they doing the same thing? And and when can you apply these tools and what’s actually happening here. So that’s what’s actually happening. We’re present valuing this information.

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